Public Assistance Forms

I. Washington Law Help Forms

A. Appeals and Hearings

Appeals and Hearings

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about appeals and hearings on government benefit issues in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Representing Yourself at an Administrative Hearing

If you do not agree with any decision, either verbal or written, made by the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), you have the right to appeal that decision by asking for an administrative hearing. This publication tells you about 1) the deadline to request a hearing, 2) how to make the request, 3) how to prepare for your hearing, and 4) what to expect at your hearing and afterward.

Video – Unemployment Insurance Hearing Demonstration

The Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) is an independent state agency which conducts impartial administrative hearings for other government agencies. This site has a video to help you prepare for your Unemployment Insurance hearing.

How to Fight Your SSI or Social Security Disability Denial

This publication explains what you can do if the Social Security Administration (SSA) denies your application because they say you are not disabled. If you have been receiving benefits and are notified that they will stop, see our publication How to Fight a Termination of SSI or SSD.

How to Petition for Superior Court Review: Administrative Decision Relating to Public Benefits

If you disagree with the final administrative decision, you may appeal your case to Superior Court. The appeal is called a “Petition for Review of an Administrative Order.” You may file your appeal either in the Superior Court of the county where you live or in Thurston County Superior Court in Olympia.

How to Present an Equitable Estoppel Defense at a DSHS Hearing

If you get an overpayment notice from DSHS saying that you owe them money or food stamps because they gave you benefits they should not have, and the overpayment was through no fault of yours, you should ask for a fair hearing, also called an administrative hearing. You have a legal defense against the overpayment. You must ask for the fair hearing within 90 days of the date of the overpayment notice. The notice may say the overpayment was unintentionally caused, rather than say it was administrative error. It will also say you have to repay it. It will not tell you that there is a legal defense against it.

B. Caring for Seniors

Caring for Seniors

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about long-term care assistance such as COPES, nursing home care and in-home care in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Questions and Answers on the Community First Choice Program

CFC is a new Medicaid program offering personal care and other services. The program was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) under 1915(k) of the Social Security Act and is administered by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS).

Questions and Answers on the COPES Program

COPES is a program that pays for personal care and other services for people in their own homes. COPES also pays for care in adult family homes, adult residential care facilities, and assisted living facilities. It is designed to help people who, without COPES, would need to be in nursing homes.

Questions and Answers on the Medicaid for Nursing Home Residents

Medicaid is a government program that pays for medical services including nursing home care. It is administered by DSHS — the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. To receive Medicaid payment for nursing home care, you must meet the financial eligibility requirements described in this publication. Also, you must need the care provided in a nursing home.

Estate Recovery for Medical Services Paid for by the State

The state has many programs that pay for medical services. The Medicaid program is one example. Under some of these programs and with important limitations, the estate recovery law allows the state to recover (to be paid back) the cost of the services it pays for.

The Medically Needy “Spenddown” Program: Medicaid for Adults 65 and Older or Disabled Who Don’t Get SSI

The Medically-Needy (MN) program helps pay medical expenses for certain people who are 65 or older, and for certain younger disabled people. It is a program for people who do not get Medicaid coverage that comes with a cash grant from Supplemental Security Income (SSI), General Assistance, or another public assistance program.

C. Cash Assistance

Cash Assistance

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about cash assistance for families in need in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

How to Present an Equitable Estoppel Defense at a DSHS Hearing

If you get an overpayment notice from DSHS saying that you owe them money or food stamps because they gave you benefits they should not have, and the overpayment was through no fault of yours, you should ask for a fair hearing, also called an administrative hearing. You have a legal defense against the overpayment. You must ask for the fair hearing within 90 days of the date of the overpayment notice. The notice may say the overpayment was unintentionally caused, rather than say it was administrative error. It will also say you have to repay it. It will not tell you that there is a legal defense against it.

Information for providers, clients, and advocates about the TANF Benefits Time Limit: February 1st, 2011

DSHS will be instituting a lifetime limit for families enrolled in TANF effective February 1, 2011

Questions and Answers on the TANF 5-Year Time Limit

There is a sixty-month (five-year) time limit for receiving TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and SFA (State Family Assistance) cash assistance. The existence of the time limit does not mean that your family will automatically stop receiving cash assistance at the end of 60 months.

TANF and Work First for College Students

If you get a TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) grant, you probably have to take part in WorkFirst if you want to go to college and keep getting TANF. Unless DSHS defers or exempts you temporarily from WorkFirst, you will have to participate in a WorkFirst activity for 32 to 40 hours a week. For most people, this first activity will be 12 weeks of intensive job search.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for Teen Parents

If you get a TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) grant, you probably have to take part in WorkFirst if you want to go to college and keep getting TANF. Unless DSHS defers or exempts you temporarily from WorkFirst, you will have to participate in a WorkFirst activity for 32 to 40 hours a week. For most people, this first activity will be 12 weeks of intensive job search.

D. Child Care

Child Care

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about child care assistance in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

What Are My Rights? Dealing with DSHS

This publication lists services available by DSHS and your rights when dealing with this state agency.

Working Connections Child Care

Washington State now has subsidized child care for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and low-income working parents. It’s called Working Connections Child Care (WCCC).

DSHS Help for People with Disabilities: Necessary Supplemental Accommodations

If you get DSHS benefits, such as TANF, SFA, Disability Lifeline, Medicaid, or food assistance, DSHS must accommodate your disabilities. This means that DSHS must try to make their services and benefits available to you to the same extent that they are available to people without a disability.

How to Fight an Overpayment of Cash Assistance, Medical Assistance, or Food Stamps

An overpayment happens when you get benefits you are not eligible for according to Department of Social & Health Services (DSHS) rules.

Representing Yourself at an Administrative Hearing

If you do not agree with any decision, either verbal or written, made by the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), you have the right to appeal that decision by asking for an administrative hearing. This publication tells you about 1) the deadline to request a hearing, 2) how to make the request, 3) how to prepare for your hearing, and 4) what to expect at your hearing and afterward.

E. DSHS Programs and Problems

DSHS Programs and Problems

Browse the resources below to find general legal information and resources about DSHS programs and what to do if you have problems with DSHS in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Department of Social and Health Services

Information about government services and how to apply for them. Information provided in many languages.

DSHS Help for People with Disabilities: Necessary Supplemental Accommodations

If you get DSHS benefits, such as TANF, SFA, Disability Lifeline, Medicaid, or food assistance, DSHS must accommodate your disabilities. This means that DSHS must try to make their services and benefits available to you to the same extent that they are available to people without a disability.

Representing Yourself at an Administrative Hearing

If you do not agree with any decision, either verbal or written, made by the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), you have the right to appeal that decision by asking for an administrative hearing. This publication tells you about 1) the deadline to request a hearing, 2) how to make the request, 3) how to prepare for your hearing, and 4) what to expect at your hearing and afterward.

What Are My Rights? Dealing with DSHS

This publication lists services available by DSHS and your rights when dealing with this state agency.

Exception to Rule (ETR) DSHS Programs

The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is able to give you some types of benefits even if you don’t meet all of the requirements. This is called an “exception to a rule” or “ETR”. DSHS considers ETR requests on a case-by-case basis and approves requests only in limited circumstances.

F. Emergency Cash and Food Assistance

Emergency Cash and Food Assistance

Browse the resources below to learn about emergency cash and food  assistance available in Washington state.

Consolidated Emergency Assistance Program (CEAP): Extra Money for Needy Families

CEAP is a welfare (DSHS) program that provides money to needy families, children and pregnant women facing an emergency. You may qualify for a CEAP emergency grant only if you are not eligible for any other DSHS financial or emergency assistance program.

Do You Need Food Assistance Right Away?

Information about who qualifies for emergency food assistance and what to do if you are denied.

Additional Requirements (AR)

If you qualify for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), State Financial Assistance (SFA), or a Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) welfare grant through DSHS and you have an emergency, you may be eligible to get “Additional Requirements (AR).” AR is a once-a-year cash grant for emergency needs.

DSHS Help for People with Disabilities: Necessary Supplemental Accommodations

If you get DSHS benefits, such as TANF, SFA, Disability Lifeline, Medicaid, or food assistance, DSHS must accommodate your disabilities. This means that DSHS must try to make their services and benefits available to you to the same extent that they are available to people without a disability.

DCAP: Washington State’s Disaster Cash Assistance Program

This program is for people who suffered losses (income or property) and live in an area the Governor of Washington has declared a disaster.

G. Emergency Shelter & Assistance

Emergency Shelter & Assistance

Browse the resources below to find general information and resources on emergency shelter and assistance in Washington state.

Help for People Unable to Work: ABD and HEN

The ABD and HEN programs may be able to help you if you have very low income and resources AND are unable to work due to disability or “incapacity”. Read more for details.

Local HEN Administrator Directory Homeless Prevention Assistance

A directory of HEN administration locations by county.

How to Fight a Denial or Termination of Eligibility for the Housing and Essential Needs (HEN) Referral Program for Medical Reasons

The HEN Referral Program can provide non-cash help for people who are unable to work. You must meet the income and incapacity requirements to establish eligibility for the HEN Referral Program. This publication explains what you can do if DSHS denies or terminates your eligibility for the HEN Referral Program.

H. Food Assistance

Food Assistance

Browse the resources below covering general legal information and resources about food assistance in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Food Stamps (Basic Food Benefits)/ABAWD Time Limit and Work Requirements

Read this if you receive food stamps (Basic Food benefits) and you are an Able-Bodied Adult Without Dependents (ABAWD).

Washington Basic Food Program – General Eligibility Rules

Information about who can get food stamps, how to apply and what to do if you are denied or terminated from the food stamp program.

Washington Basic Food Program Information

Basic Food, the state’s food stamp program, helps people in Washington make ends meet by providing monthly benefits to buy food. You can apply online at this web site.

Applying for Public Assistance

Information about the application process to receive public assistance.

Do You Need Food Assistance Right Away?

Information about who qualifies for emergency food assistance and what to do if you are denied.

I. Health Care Reform/Affordable Care Act

Health Care Reform/Affordable Care Act

Browse the resources below to learn about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and medical choices in Washington state according to WashingtonLawHelp.org. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Individual Health Insurance in Washington State

This article provides information about applying for and comparing individual insurance products in Washington, including products sold through the Washington Health Benefit Exchange (HBE) and products offered in the “outside market.”

When Can I Enroll in a Plan Through Washington Healthplanfinder?

The next open enrollment period for Qualified Health Plan (QHP) begins November 1, 2016 and closes January 31, 2017. Read frequently asked questions and answers.

Health Care Reform – General Information

If you do not have health insurance or your health insurance does not cover the care you need, you may have new options under the Affordable Care Act, the federal health reform law.

Health Care Reform – Qualified Health Plans

If you do not have health insurance, or your health insurance does not cover the care you need, you may have new options under the Affordable Care Act, the federal health reform law. Depending on your income, you may be able to get free insurance from Washington Apple Health (“WAH”).

Health Care Reform – Immigrant Eligibility

The Affordable Care Act includes several provisions that may help you get coverage for your medical bills if you are an immigrant.

J. Medicaid/Medicare

Medicaid/Medicare

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about Medicaid and Medicare. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Apple Health Managed Care and Your Rights – Formerly Called “Healthy Options”

Washington State’s Medicaid program, along with other state health programs, is now called “Apple Health.” The state agency that runs these programs is called the Health Care Authority, or “HCA.”

Questions and Answers on Medicaid for Nursing Home Residents

Medicaid is a government program that pays for medical services including nursing home care. It is administered by DSHS — the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. To receive Medicaid payment for nursing home care, you must meet the financial eligibility requirements described in this publication. Also, you must need the care provided in a nursing home.

Questions and Answers on the Community First Choice Program

CFC is a new Medicaid program offering personal care and other services. The program was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) under 1915(k) of the Social Security Act and is administered by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS).

Medicare Information for 2016 – Deductibles, Premiums, and Co-Payments for Parts A & B

DATE: January 1, 2016 FROM: Ann LoGerfo

Key Medicaid Standards as of July 2016

DATE: July 1, 2016 FROM: Columbia Legal Services

K. Public Benefits for Immigrants and Refugees

Public Benefits for Immigrants and Refugees

Browse resources below covering public benefits for immigrants and refugees in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Washington Public Assistance for Immigrants Who Are Not Lawfully Present

This publication explains what benefits you may be eligible for if you are an immigrant who is not considered to be lawfully present in the U.S.

Public Charge: When is it safe for immigrants to use public benefits?

This publication explains the U.S. government’s “public charge” rules, which govern when getting public benefits may affect your immigration status or ability to get legal status in the future and your ability to travel outside of the U.S. without having problems with your immigration status. We also explain when it is and is not safe to use public benefits.

Applying for Public Assistance

Information about the application process to receive public assistance.

Washington Public Assistance for Family Visa Beneficiaries

This publication explains what public benefits you may be eligible for if you have lawful permanent resident (“green card”) status because a family member filed a family visa petition for you. People who get their status this way are referred to as “family visa beneficiaries.”

Washington Public Assistance for Lawfully Present Non-Citizens

This publication is for certain immigrants and immigration applicants who the government considers to be lawfully present in the U.S. Lawfully present immigrants are eligible for some state and federal benefits programs, if they meet other program requirements.

L. Public Benefits for Native Americans

Public Benefits for Native Americans

Browse resources below about public benefits for Native Americans in Washington state.

Earned Income Tax Credit Info for Native Americans

A guide to claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit for Native Americans.

Native American and Alaska Native Property Owners: Exemptions from Estate Recovery

This publication is about property owned by Native Americans and Alaska Natives. You can find information about exemptions for other types of property in our brochure called, “Estate Recovery for Medical Services paid for by the State.” That brochure also explains which DSHS medical programs require estate recovery.

Social Security Online – American Indian & Alaska Natives (AIAN) Web Site

The AIAN website provides basic information and ongoing updates of programs administered by the Social Security Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS). We also provide information on how individuals and tribes or nations can contact the Social Security Administration, ongoing outreach efforts, and links to related federal programs. You may apply online for benefits.

Native American Unit Flyer

Are you facing an issue in school? Do you need help with your attendance or performance in school? We can help! Informational brochure about NJP’s Native American Unit.

Native American Unit 3-Fold Brochure

A 3-fold promotional brochure about NJP’s Native American Unit.

Tribal Trust Fund Settlement Payments

Use this publication if you have received or may be receiving money as a result of the Tribal Trust Accounting and Management lawsuits filed by tribes against the United States; and you get or may apply for needs-based public benefits including Supplemental Security Income (SSI), food assistance, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Medicaid; and you may file a tax statement for 2012.

M. Public Benefits for People with Criminal Histories

Public Benefits for People with Criminal Histories

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about public benefits for people with criminal charges or histories in Washington state.

Arrested? What Happens to Your Benefits if You Go to Jail or Prison?

A Guide to Federal Rules on SSI, SSDI, Medicaid, Medicare and Veterans Benefits for Adults with Disabilities

What is DSHS Stops My Benefits Because I am a “Fleeing Felon”?

If you are a fleeing felon, you are not eligible for many federal and state public benefits. This publication defines “feeling felon” and discusses the benefits that are affected.

What if Social Security Stops My Benefits Because I Am a “Fleeing Felon”?

Social Security will consider you a fleeing felon and ineligible for their benefits if you have an outstanding arrest warrant specifically for fleeing prosecution or confinement on a felony charge. The rules have changed. Under federal law, you cannot get Social Security benefits if you are fleeing to avoid prosecution for a felony OR violating the terms of probation or parole.

What Do I Do If the Veterans Administration Stops My Benefits Because I Am a “Fugitive Felon”?

The Veterans Administration bars three types of felons from receiving VA benefits. The types are, (1) felony charges with an outstanding warrant; (2) felony conviction with an outstanding warrant, or (3) a violation of probation or parole when the underlying crime was a felony. This publication discusses each of these.

Have you lost SSI, Social Security disability, or retirement benefits because of a PROBATION or PAROLE VIOLATION WARRANT?

If so, you may be entitled to back benefits because of the Clark v. Astrue class action litigation. The Social Security Administration is required to provide benefits to people whose benefits were unlawfully suspended or denied on or after October 24, 2006.

N. Public & Subsidized Housing

Public & Subsidized Housing

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general information, self-help packets and resources for public and subsidized housing tenants in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Public and Subsidized Housing: When I Do Not Pay the Rent

If you are a tenant who lives in public housing or a federally subsidized apartment complex, you have greater protection against eviction than other tenants. But these rights are limited. If you do not pay your rent, in most cases the landlord can evict you. This publication briefly explains how to avoid eviction for nonpayment of rent.

Public Housing: Community Service/Self-Sufficiency Requirement

Adult tenants living in Public Housing are required to spend eight hours a month performing community service or participating in an economic self-sufficiency program.

Public Housing Evictions

As a public housing tenant, you have greater protection against evictions than most other tenants do. You have these protections because if you are evicted from public housing, you will lose your federal housing subsidy, often worth hundreds of dollars per month. This publication briefly explains what you should do when the Housing Authority tries to evict you from public housing.

Public Housing Grievance Procedure

As a public housing tenant, you have the right to appeal many decisions or actions taken by the Housing Authority through its administrative Public Housing Grievance Procedure. Every Housing Authority is required by federal law to adopt a written public housing grievance procedure. A copy of the agency’s grievance procedure should be posted in their office and available upon request.

HUD Housing Evictions

As a tenant living in an apartment complex where the landlord has a contract with the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), you have more protection against evictions than most other tenants. This publication briefly explains your rights and the steps you can take to avoid an eviction.

O. Social Security Benefits

Social Security Benefits

Browse the resources below to learn about Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability (SSD) and other social security benefits from WashingtonLawHelp.org. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Benefits CheckUp

BenefitsCheckUp helps thousands every day to find programs for people ages 55 and over that may pay for some of their costs of prescription drugs, health care, utilities, and other essential items or services. Please fill out our simple questionnaire to find programs that can assist you or your loved ones.

Apply Online for Disability Benefits

Social Security offers an online disability application you can complete at your convenience. Apply from the comfort of your home or any location at a time most convenient for you. You do not need to drive to your local Social Security office or wait for an appointment with a Social Security representative.

I Have Disabilities and I Want to Work: Benefits Advisors

This publication is for people who live in Washington state, have Social Security disability-based benefits, Medicare, SSI-related Medicaid or long term care services, or other disability based benefits and want to work.

Video-SSDI Overpayments: A Video in ASL

A short video describing SSDI overpayments and what you can do if you receive an overpayment notice from Social Security.

Social Security Information for 2016

DATE: January 1, 2016 FROM: Columbia Legal Services

P. State Benefits (non-Medicaid)

State Benefits (non-Medicaid)

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about non-Mediciad state programs in Washington. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Local HEN Administrator Directory – Homeless Prevention Assistance

A directory of HEN administration locations by county.

Applying for Public Assistance

Information about the application process to receive public assistance.

DSHS Help for People with Disabilities: Necessary Supplemental Accommodations

If you get DSHS benefits, such as TANF, SFA, Disability Lifeline, Medicaid, or food assistance, DSHS must accommodate your disabilities. This means that DSHS must try to make their services and benefits available to you to the same extent that they are available to people without a disability.

Exception to Rule (ETR) DSHS Programs

The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is able to give you some types of benefits even if you don’t meet all of the requirements. This is called an “exception to a rule” or “ETR”. DSHS considers ETR requests on a case-by-case basis and approves requests only in limited circumstances.

What Are My Rights? Dealing with DSHS

This publication lists services available by DSHS and your rights when dealing with this state agency.

Q. Unemployment Compensation

Unemployment Compensation

Browse the resources below to learn about unemployment compensation issues in Washington state. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Are you eligible to claim unemployment benefits?

Read the requirements and fill out an online application.

Unemployment Law Project Web Site

Are you having trouble collecting your unemployment benefits? Has your claim been improperly denied? Or has your employer appealed your entitlement to benefits? If so, we may be able to help.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

Read this publication if a natural disaster hit your town and it caused you to lose your job (or caused your employer to reduce your hours).

Video – The Unemployment Law Project (ULP): Who We Are & What We Do

This video explains what the Unemployment Law Project is, what services ULP provides, and guides viewers to additional resources available from the Employment Security Department and others. The video also provides a brief overview of the process of applying for unemployment benefits and appealing if an applicant is turned down.

How Do I Appeal my Denial of Unemployment Benefits to Superior Court?

This publication is about Superior Court review of an administrative decision relating to unemployment benefits.

R. Veterans Benefits

Veterans Benefits

In this section of WashingtonLawHelp.org you will find general legal information and resources about veterans’ benefits. Popular forms and packets include the following:

Benefits

This web page provides information about benefits that are available to veterans and their families.

Benefits Delivery at Discharge (BDD)

The Benefits Delivery at Discharge Program or BDD allows a Servicemember to apply for disability compensation benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prior to retirement or separation from military service.

Improved Pension Program (for Veterans, Their Surviving Spouse, and Dependent Children)

The Improved Pension Program (IPP) is a benefit payable by the Department of Veterans Affairs to veterans of a period of war because of nonservice-connected disability or age.

Representing Washington Veterans: Basic Legal and Cultural Concepts

This guide introduces attorneys to the basic concepts of culture and law that underpin effective assistance of veterans.

Disability Compensation

Disability compensation is a benefit paid to a veteran because of injuries or diseases that happened while on active duty, or were made worse by active military service. It is also paid to certain veterans disabled from VA health care. The benefits are tax-free.

S. Welfare Fraud & Overpayment

Welfare Fraud & Overpayment

Browse the resources below to learn about welfare fraud and overpayment issues on WashingtonLawHelp.org.

Fighting a Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability (SSDI) Overpayment Notice

Is the Social Security Administration charging you with an overpayment? If so, Social Security believes that you got benefits when you were not eligible to get them. They must notify you in writing of the overpayment before they may take any money from your check. You may take four different actions if you get an overpayment notice.

How to Fight an Overpayment of Cash Assistance, Medical Assistance, or Food Stamps

An overpayment happens when you get benefits you are not eligible for according to Department of Social & Health Services (DSHS) rules.

Video – SSDI Overpayments: What to Do if You Got a Notice of Overpayment from Social Security

This video is for people who get SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance). It will explain what you can do if Social Security sends you a letter telling you that they are going to take money out of your check for an overpayment. If you get SSI (Supplemental Security Income), we have a different video that will help you because the rules are not the same. If you don’t know if you are getting SSI or SSDI, you can call your local Social Security office to ask.

Video – SSI Overpayments: What to Do if You Got a Notice of Overpayment from Social Security

This video is for people who get SSI (Supplemental Security Income). It will explain what you can do if Social Security sends you a letter telling you that they are going to take money out of your check for an overpayment. If you get SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance), we have a different video that will help you because the rules are not the same. If you don’t know if you are getting SSI or SSDI, you can call your local Social Security office to ask.

II. Other Helpful Resources

A. Benefits.gov Washington Resources

Benefits.Gov Washington Resources

Benefits.Gov is the official benefits website of the U.S. government. Their mission is to reduce the expense and difficulty of interacting with the government while increasing citizen access to benefit information. Browse available Washington State government benefits on this website.

B. DSHS Forms, Applications, and Resources

Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Forms, Applications, and Resources

DSHS is a Washington State Department dedicated to transform lives. The DSHS Vision is that: People are healthy; People are safe; People are supported; and Taxpayer resources are guarded. Find forms, applications, and resources by need:

C. HCA Forms, Applications, and Resources

HCA (Washington State Healthcare Authority) Forms, Applications, and Resources

The Washington State Health Care Authority purchases health care for more than 2 million Washington residents through two programs — Washington Apple Health (Medicaid) and the Public Employees Benefits Board (PEBB) Program. HCA works with partners to help ensure Washingtonians have access to better health and better care at a lower cost.

Community First Choice (CFC): CFC is for people living outside of a medical institution, who are eligible for categorically needy (CN) or alternate benefit plan (ABP) scope of care through Medicaid, and who meet nursing facility level of care (NFLOC) or the criteria to reside in an Intermediate Care Facility for the Intellectually Disabled (ICF/ID).

Medicaid: In Washington State, Medicaid is called Apple Health. Apple Health provides preventative care, like cancer screenings, treatment for diabetes and high blood pressure, and many other health care services

D. HUD.Gov Forms

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

This is the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) one-stop forms resource page. HUD’s mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all. HUD is working to strengthen the housing market to bolster the economy and protect consumers; meet the need for quality affordable rental homes; utilize housing as a platform for improving quality of life; build inclusive and sustainable communities free from discrimination, and transform the way HUD does business.

E. OAH Public Assistance/Welfare Hearings

OAH (Office of Administrative Hearings) Public Assistance/Welfare Hearings FAQ

A party may request a hearing when the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) tries to deny, change, or end benefits. The hearing is held by an independent and impartial judge at the Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH).

F. Social Security Administration: Seattle Region

Social Security Administration: Seattle Region

The Social Security Administration’s Seattle Region proudly serves the residents of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington

G. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs – Seattle Regional Benefits Office

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs – Seattle Regional Benefits Office

VA Mission Statement: To fulfill President Lincoln’s promise “To care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan” by serving and honoring the men and women who are America’s veterans.

H. Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs

Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs

The Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs helps connect veterans and their family members to the benefits and services they earned through their military service. 

Links Updated February 14, 2017.